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WETA
Sep 17, 2010 12:30am EDT
million copies around the world. his latest is a look at how each one of us can leave a lasting legacy will be on our time at birth. the new text is called "outlive your life." also, a special performance from john mellencamp. it is in stores this week. author and preacher max lucado and a special performance from john mellencamp. >> his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide is proud to join tavis a. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: max lucado is a renowned preacher who sit -- preaches in san antonio. he is a best-selling author whose books have sold more than a 55 million copies around the world. his latest text is called "outlive your life: if you were made to make a difference." thank you for join
WETA
Sep 10, 2010 12:30am EDT
it is about who we choose to represent us. it is about the words they speak and the message they bring and what it is that they reflect and emulate, and that those people, when we cannot necessarily rely on what our spirit says, can help us identify and understand what is resonating in us, even when it is uncomfortable. i have been lucky. since the very beginning of my career, from the moment i work with michael jackson until now, i have had the same manager who has always been on a course of enlightenment and consciousness and has been a great source of strength, and he has run at me with people i can count on. tavis: you mentioned obama, and i will get back to michael jackson. >> i just wanted to make sure that use all the hair. tavis: we will bring that back. hold up that photo? i want to see that again. i have to ask about obama. you got political during the campaign this last time around. has that been a journey for you? >> i have always been political. when i was a kid, when i got to vote for the first time, my mother was a democrat and a father was republican. secretly, al
WETA
Sep 19, 2010 10:30am EDT
good to have you with us. another historic event for pope benedict the 16th this week. his four-day visit to the yinged kingdom. king henry viii broke ties with the roman catholic church almost 500 years ago. as kim reports, benedict's trip has not been without controversy. >> pope benedict went to the uk at the invitation of queen elizabeth ii, the official head of england. the only was john pall ii in 1982. he was greeted with an outpouring of affection. pope benedict has faced outright protests. one major issue is outrage over the clergy sex abuse crisis still swirling over many parts of europe. at the beginning of the trip, benedict admitted the church was not quick and decisive to take the necessary measures to combat the crisis. another is between roman catholics and the anglo-american community. last october the vatican made it easier for disaffected anglocans to become catholic. a highlight is the trip is the -- but perhaps the biggest challenge has been making the case for faith and a nation known for growing secularism. throughout the trip benedict called for the values of
WETA
Sep 1, 2010 12:00am EDT
several different brain regions that communicate using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. the this circuit helps us to repeat the behaviors that make us happy while avoiding those that make us miserable. but as any adult knows, pleasure is not always good for you. tonight we'll also explore particularly dangerous forms of pleasure-seeking, addiction. long considered to be a moral weakness, addiction is now understood to be a biological disease. finally, we will explore the role that emotions play in decision-making and social interaction. next month, in part two of the emotional brain, we will turn our focus to negative emotions such as fear and anxiety. joining us tonight, a group of scientists who have devoted their lives to understanding the emotional brain. daniel salzman, he studies how the brain assigns an emotional value to the information that it receives from the five senses. he is an assistant professor of sky tri and neuroscience at columbia university. wolfram schultz. he studies how the brain's reward systems affect decision-making and learning. he is a professor
WETA
Sep 23, 2010 12:00pm EDT
order, to use a high faluting word. tell me what forces are at work and how does russia adjust to them? >> well, certainly i believe we would all agree that the world is changing. it's not only globalizing but becoming more and more competitive. new centers of economic power, financial power appear and certainly with economic and financial might comes political influence. and that's what we call multipolarity in progress and that certainly must be taken into account by all series foreign policy planners. the united states, i think, under the obama administration understands much better need to build coalition which was already evident during the bush administration time, but the obama foreign policy said very clearly that it must be multilateral i it must take into account the existence of problems with which the united states with all of its assets. >> rose: does that offer opportunities for the united states and russia to cooperate in ways that it has not before? >> i think it does. and not only for the united states and russia but also for europe because the competition which we now
WETA
Sep 28, 2010 12:30am EDT
? >> first of all, airtran brings us a number of things. they have a safe low cost high quality operation. they have a strong low fare brand. but most importantly, it provides us an opportunity to expand our route network. they fly places that we don't. we have very little overlapping routes. but notably, their largest operation is in atlanta. and we have no service to atlanta at all, as one example. it brings us more access to new york's laguardia airport, as well as first-time access for us to reagan national airport in washington d.c.. >> susie: where kelly, why did you do it now? >> i feel like we're ready now. first of all, things are so much better today than they were a year ago. our profit outlook is solid. we have plenty of cash on hand. we have a very strong balance sheet, with credit rating agencies affirming our credit rating today. so financially we're very well prepared for this. we also have a very strong leadership team. who is ready to add this major task to our list. and then we have the tools in place today that we just haven't had in the past to optimize our route netw
WETA
Sep 3, 2010 12:30am EDT
kendrick meek0 also with us is a musical legend dr. john from new orleans. he is the most visible ambassador for his town. along with his band, he is out with a new cd. join us tonight for kendrick meek and dr. john. >> all leno is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> james? >> yes. >> everyone making a difference. you help us live better. >> nationwide supports tavis in working to improve financial literacy and removing obstacles to financial empowerment one conversation at time. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: perhaps nowhere is there more attention paid in the senate race in florida. kendrick meek is the four term congressman who recently won the nomination for the senate seat. he joins us from miami. first of all, congratulations. it is an honor to have you on the program. >> thank you. i am honored to be here. tavis: usually it is the big election where you have to come out with the big guns blazing. it must feel like you have been through the main
WETA
Sep 17, 2010 1:00am EDT
want us to overcome our addiction to chinese-funded debt. >> reporter: so what happens next? the administration is promising to press china on its currency when it meets with other world leaders in korea in november. and then there is the usual talk in congress of passing a tougher law. >> i think the only way that we'll get them to feel we're more serious is if we start moving legislation in this congress that has more teeth. >> reporter: the administration did suggest today that it wants to see china allow it's currency to move about 20% higher against the dollar. since june, the change has been just 1.5%. darren gersh, "nightly business report," washington. >> susie: meanwhile, president obama was talking up the need for american businesses to export more. meeting with his export council, the president renewed his pledge to double the nation's exports over the next five years. he says boosting them means more american jobs. >> the world wants to buy goods and services made in the united states, and our workers are ready to produce them. >> susie: but are they? diane eastabrook
WETA
Sep 12, 2010 9:30am EDT
stoning. ayaan hirsi ali wrote a book about why she left islam. >> i would never use the expression anti-islamic sentiment. i think it's more precise to distinguish between political islam on the one hand and religious islam and spiritual islam. and i have seen, yes, a growing knowledge on political islam, a growing interest in political islam, and a growing condemnation of political islam by more and more americans. i find both american men and women audiences that i speak condemn practices in the name of islam against women, the forced veiling of women, forced marriages of women, the guardian principle. there have been some eye-catching stories, for instance the 18-year old yemeni girl who was married off to an 80-year old man and who managed to escape that. so there is condemnation of these practices and there is condemnation of honor killings, condemnation of female genital mutilation. that is not a command in the koran, but in some obscure hadith, but practiced widely in muslim countries and among muslim immigrants to the u.s. >> so, does the thing that ms. a alreadyi mention d
WETA
Sep 26, 2010 9:00am EDT
cost us too much of our money, so often, too much borrowed money. but where to cut it and what are the irrelevant programs? that gets to be a lot more difficult. all i can think of is little things that we expect the federal government is doing something about, and then we are shocked when we find out that they are not doing something about it. we expected, for example, in the gulf of mexico, that the government had amazing undersea capacity to shot that well down itself. it does not -- to shut the well down itself. does not. the snake and in the houston rivers and other asian imports, we expect the government to do something about it. likewise, we expect to do something about the cavendish banana that we have eaten all our allies. it is actually a clone. -- all our lives here it is actually a clone. it happened months ago with another banana which is long away. but we think we always have bananas -- the bees are stressed and dying, we hope that the government is studying it. bats are dying, and we hope the government is studying it. these are not trivial. any large disappearance o
WETA
Sep 19, 2010 9:00am EDT
convince people of its merit. >> i would like to get back to the word that phil used which is charisma and obama's charisma. that seems to me is what a lot of these tea party candidates have. that have this charismatic way about them. somebody like christine o'donnell, really very perky. >> let's explain. >> choose from delaware. she won the republican primary. very perky, very personable. a lot of the things that attract people to sarah palin are attracted to christine o'donnell in that way could you have ren paul has charisma of his own in kentucky. he is very plain-spoken. he's very sort of forthright. he seems very genuine to people. that is very charismatic. that is something that i think democrats are going to have to look at. they talk about the energy. >> people feel they want somebody on a horse riding up to the west to the south in the >> exactly. these people seem to be on a horse. the horse the what the right is what they feel is a horse against the president's social democratic policies. they do not like them. they do not want them. the democrats have to point out
WETA
Sep 17, 2010 12:00pm EDT
writes the autobiography of our species. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportionatel
WETA
Sep 26, 2010 10:00am EDT
important lesson you have learned in life so far, and how do you use it on a day-to-day basis to navigate through life? some very special people give some very wonderful and heartfelt answers. so, sit back,relax and enjoy it. what do you think is the single greatest lesson you've learned professionally? >> i think persistence in trying to get a story. >> boy, were you, like getting into university. >> that was true. >> and getting your first job, with all those rejection letters. >> getting into university was hard because i didn't have latin and you had to have latin in england to get in. >> but persistence i can see. >> persistence is the thing. i think i must have been the world's biggest bore, to go on and on, i want to do this and that, please let me in, please let me. i think they said just give him something to get rid of him. >> on a personal level, what is the biggest lesson you learned? on a human level? >> on the real human level, it's the value of other people who may disagree with you -- i've been so lucky in my marriage and in my association with colleagues. i did not know a
WETA
Sep 20, 2010 11:30pm EDT
that these sanctions have been a blessing in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the s
WETA
Sep 1, 2010 11:00pm EDT
decision we rely on our emotions somewhat to help guide us. last month, we talked about positive emotions such as reward and pleasure. tonight we turn to fear and anxiety. human have evolved to feel fear in response to danger and to exhibit aggression when threatened. today fear and aggression can be found throughout the animal kingdom. by studying these emotions in animals, we may one day learn how to control violent behavior in ourselves. last month we discussed how the brap's pleasure circuits are corrupted by addiction. this evening we will learn how the brain's fear circuits go awry in clinical syndromes of fear such as chronic anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. human anxiety disorders are some of the most common mental illnesss in the country. nearly one-third of all americans will exhibit symptoms of an anxiety disorder at least once during his or her lifetime. post-traumatic stress disorder's also becoming more prevalent. more than 40,000 war veterans are currently affected by this illness with thousands more cases going unreported. thankfully, progress has been
WETA
Sep 30, 2010 2:00am EDT
united states and in fact this week for u.n. week was quite important for us because the basic multilateral firms we did have unique opportunity to have good promotion events for mongolia, especially for business environment and also bilateral meetings with many other dignitaries. so what we have found is growing and strong interest to mongolia and most importantly support from our friends. >> rose: thank you for coming. >> i know you have to leave the country and safe travel and look forward to coming to mongolia. >> thank you, please, do come to mongolia. i especially invite you to co. >> rose: watch out, i'll come. (laughs) any golf courses over there? >> yes. in fact we have one. >> rose: one? you only need one. i think if you come to mongolia you better spend your time fishing and hunting. >> you can try different golf courses. it would be interesting for you. wow, this is a cold country. >> rose: thank you very much. >> thank you. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep rest
WETA
Sep 6, 2010 11:00pm EDT
important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i think this was someone who had regularly changed but had done so in this period far more extreme than he'd ever done before. and clearly part of this was him coming back and engaging more in the art world of paris after having really spent the previous two years not wanting to be engaged in it. finding that younger artists, cubist artists, were now at the forefront of affairs and feeling that he's being pushed a bit back in time and feeling that even if he didn't feel so sympathetic with what they were doing, he knew that he was going to engage with what they were doing and learn what he could. and then also, of course, the other great thing that happened in that time-- or rather not so great-- was the outbreak of world war i. and i think he felt in this period that he wasn't allowed to fight in the war because he was deemed too old at 44. but i think he felt that in extreme times it gave
WETA
Sep 21, 2010 1:00am EDT
counts. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive down unemployment, and we're not even ac
WETA
Sep 26, 2010 9:30am EDT
start taking effect. democrats are using these changes to try to get out their base out to the polls in november. >> any young adult under 26 can be added to a family plan as long as he or she doesn't have employer-based coverage. this year preventive care begins being offered with no co-pays and deductibles so kids' immunizations and cancer screenings, we think it is really good for people to get preventive care up front and not pay for the disease in the long run. this year small employers get a tax credit for covering their employees and that will carry on. this year seniors get a $250 check to help close the doughnut hole. next year, they'll have a 50% discount in the cost of the drugs and that gradually goes up. >> what is the toughest mart companies don't put more costs on the employee or what is it? >> what the president knew and what members of congress who were supportive knew from the beginning is that we really have to tackle quality costs and access all at the same time. a lot of work on some of the prevention and wellness issues that are going to be very critical to lower t
WETA
Sep 15, 2010 6:00pm EDT
will eat for a whole day. that is clearly, obviously, not enough. her husband works with us almost like these in the nearby village. the united nations food and agricultural organization is trying to help herder's. >> the crisis has brought affected production, but it has also affected the status of the animals, and these animals are the livelihood of these herder's. without these, they will be destitute, so that is why we need to save these animals. fao has been distributing animal feed to save these animals. >> of the harvests have improved somewhat this year, niger still faces a catastrophic hundred prices -- hunger crisis because the poor are so much norrish they simply cannot afford enough food to get strong again. this is a government-run from center that deals with children suffering from acute malnutrition. this mother has just brought her baby in to be assessed. this is the mother's third child. she is one year old. she will be admitted for attention, but the doctor said it is difficult to have to decide is accepted for treatment. >> there are places that have had to make
WETA
Sep 9, 2010 12:00pm EDT
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning
WETA
Sep 20, 2010 12:00pm EDT
through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the lives of other people
WETA
Sep 23, 2010 11:15pm EDT
simple words mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more tha
WETA
Sep 7, 2010 7:00pm EDT
us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revolution and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now these two words d dissatisfaction" and "anger." parse tho
WETA
Sep 11, 2010 6:00pm EDT
making to return us to prosperity. >> democratic chairman tim kaine. two questions that should make you feel queasy, regardless of your affiliation. do you feel that the children's generation will be better than ours? 66%. do you think america is in a state of decline? 65% believe the country is in a state of decline. how do you combat that? >> it is tough to do. america, historically, internationally, has been the home office of national optimism. this has been the most optimistic place on the place of -- face of the earth. if you are optimistic about the future, you can breed confidence. if you are optimistic about the gi bill, water, air pollution acts -- but when the ball lack optimism, there is a sense of hunkering down. i cannot be concerned about other people. it makes me more self obsessed. it has a political ripple effect that is of enormous, and i do not think it has been totally calculated. >> the president says we will put money into infrastructure. john boehner said we want to cut taxes and spending. how does that communicate to the american people? >> it does not commi
WETA
Sep 3, 2010 6:30pm EDT
much of a challenge it's been for us. >> reporter: experts in manufacturing, like jerry jasinowski, aren't surprised. he estimates one fifth of the nation's unemployment problem is structural, meaning there's a mismatch between what people can do and what the economy needs them to do. >> all of this talk about short- term stimulus, even with the good ideas that are sometimes laid out, misses the point that there is not a short-term fix to this high unemployment problem. we are in a new slower growth economy with higher unemployment, and we are going to have to invest a lot more in skill training. >> reporter: but greenblatt's strategy is to keep costs low, move fast and deliver high quality. that's how he beats china. to do that, he says, he needs workers right now. so why don't you just train them, isn't that the solution? >> : that's a good strategy, the problem is that we're lean. and when you're lean, you don't have a lot of people who are around who have free time to train. >> reporter: other employers we spoke with say some jobs are hard to fill, but for different reasons. so
WETA
Sep 18, 2010 1:00am EDT
, and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. gold prices have never been this high, suzanne, topping $1,277 an ounce in today's trading. >> suzanne: tom, gold's not the only metal shining on wall street. silver is at a 30-year high, closing at $20.82 an ounce. >> tom: been quite some rally, but the high prices metals are getting aren't scaring off buyers. as scott gurvey reports, the big rally in metals is expected to continue. >> reporter: five records in six weeks. it seems all that glitters on the futures exchanges are contracts in gold. analysts at goldman sachs, the royal bank of scotland and deutsche bank all published research notes making the case for the yellow metal today. analyst jim steel at h.s.b.c. says there are many reasons to expect the trend to continue. >> we still have a lot of financial market fragility, a lot of uncertainty about the economy going forward. we've had the reintroduction of quantitative easing, and we've also had a lot of volatility in the currency markets. when you combine all those things,
WETA
Sep 28, 2010 6:30pm EDT
already announced plans for 600 temporary toys 'r us express shops. the associated press is reporting the f.b.i. and the labor department are investigating the former head of the service employees international union for possible corruption. at issue: andy stern's approval of a california union leader's salary. stern resigned from the union abruptly in april. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street is "frontier." find out why that could be the place for global investors with an appetite for risk. >> susie: $1,300 and then some-- that's where gold prices closed today. gold rallied for the fifth straight day to a new high of $1,308. the precious metal is up 32% in the past year as investors seek safety. long-time metals traders like m.f. global's kevin grady think the buying binge will continue. >> well, i think we definitely hit $1,400 by christmas and possibly $1,500. i think, you know, what you need to look at is, who is going to step up and sell it? the bottom line is that it's very hard for these miners to get the gold out of the ground. >> susie: grady thinks d
WETA
Sep 14, 2010 12:30am EDT
issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now we see a number of banks that are going to be able to come out next year and raise their dividends. that's important from an investment standpoint. >> reporter: others say banks should now feel more comfortable using their excess capital to buy back shares, make acquisitions or maybe even make new loans. still, the basel agreement consists of broad generalizations without a lot of specifics. credit suisse analyst moshe orenbach says investors need to keep in mind that u.s. regulators aren't done yet making new rules for u.s. banks. >> the most definitive capital standards will be those written by the federal reserve over the course of the next year. and, they will take these basel standards into account. so, i guess it
WETA
Sep 21, 2010 12:30am EDT
reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes first. in just a few minutes, i will be joined by a the huffington post co-founder arianna huffington, and tomorrow, we have a team robbins and the plea he has written about the jamestown settlement. later in the week, philip seymour hoffman, who is making his directorial debut. on thursday night, the "house" star hugh laurie is here, and then we revisit a documentary on baseball. tonight, we begin our week with kathleen sebelius, former governor of kansas, the now, of course, serves as president obama note's secretary of health and human services -- serves
WETA
Sep 18, 2010 6:30pm EDT
voters summit. >> the elite don't get us, they call us wacky, they call us wing nuts, we call us "we the people." gwen: defeated republicans like delaware's mike castronevesle, bob bennett and murkowski are trying to figure out what happened. and also arlen specter and struggling incumbents like ohio governor ted strickland and president obama himself who knows he must convince voters the economy can improve. >> we stop the bleeding, stabilize the economy but the fact of the matter is the pace of improvement is not where it needs to be. and the hole we had dug ourselfs in was enormous. gwen: the scary truth appears to be rattled voters appear to lash out at lots of people for lots of reasons. let's go through some of the reasons here, panel. starting with you, john. >> the economy. i'll take the easiest, biggest target, the economy is bad and affecting people in their lives and if it's not affecting them it's affecting somebody in their lives and everybody is anxious. in this time of anxiety they turn to washington and see people they dislike, distrust and are just bafoons. and the n
WETA
Sep 3, 2010 7:00pm EDT
that it may linger over us for longer than we thought, which means more rain. >> sreenivasan: and in massachusetts, governor deval patrick warned against under-rating the storm. >> the public should continue to take precautions-- stay indoors and off the roads during the height of the storm. exercise extreme caution this afternoon when winds pick up. >> sreenivasan: out on the bay state's coast, inmates from the plymouth county jail shoveled and stacked sandbags. nearly 400 out-of-state utility crews were staged and ready. but as earl kept moving, officials up and down the coast hoped to salvage tourist revenue through labor day weekend. another bombing in pakistan has killed 54 people. it happened in quetta in the southwest, the latest in a series of such attacks. a suicide bomber targeted shiites staging a pro- palestinian rally and procession through the city. police said 160 people were wounded. the pakistani taliban claimed responsibility, and a spokesman claimed the group will launch attacks in america and europe very soon. in afghanistan, the u.s. death toll rose again, wit
WETA
Sep 1, 2010 1:00am EDT
us. >> all i know is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us live better. >> with every question and every answer, nationwide is proud to join tapis in working to remove obstacles to empowerment one obstacle at a time. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from the words like you. thank you. -- from viewers like you. ed thank you -- thank you. >> i am pleased to welcome norah jones to this program. she is on tour in support of her most recent cd. you can pick up a copy of her next project, a copy of many collective collaborations, and on october 2, she will be in milwaukee with an all-star lineup to celebrate the 25th anniversary of farmaid. before we get to that, here is the video from the song, "chasing pirates." >> ♪ and i do not know how to slow it down ♪ ♪ my mind is racing and ♪ i am chasing pirates ♪ my mind is racing, i am chasing pirates ♪ ♪ my mind is racing, i am chasing pirates ♪ >> we were chatting about tamoxifen time vs. real time. i raised -- about fa
WETA
Sep 2, 2010 12:30am EDT
be our huge seller for us, not just in the u.s., but on a worldwide basis. it is a car with zero emissions. it only produces steam. >> susie: but can you make money on it? >> that's why we are putting so much money in it. we believe eventually we will be able to make money. but it is expensive, but it is the right solution. >> susie: and mercedes benz is an underwriting of "nightly business report." >> tom: worries about the economy took a back seat thanks the better showing by u.s. manufacturers in august. let's take a look at tonight's "market focus." industrial, financial and energy stocks led the way up. all the major sectors were stronger. manufacturers like eaton were pumped up by the industry data showing a healthy expansion. eaton makes products for several industries including automotive, aerospace and even golf club grips. shares jumped almost 8% to a two-week high. engine marker cummins rallied more than 7%, recovering most of what it had lost since mid- august. the firm's corporate bond rating was upgraded by s&p. financial stocks also helped the market. bank of ameri
WETA
Sep 3, 2010 8:30pm EDT
probably mayave madethe world situation ereffor us less say. saddamsein was despicable heually controlthe try. there was no al-there when he was in power use it would have been aeato. therefore, bot the counterbal he provided to he contrver orismellsin his own y w probably in a cold ctational security way beneficial to us, not the other waound. he did not have weapons of mass destruction and since we ha good insion and he did not ha that obably for us it was not a situation for it as terribl r the irpeop but there were softening up econollyd await all this concern crediblesia herte. >> the clinton administrn was attacked releny over this. thousands of irawere dyi beca of the embargo especially iraqi children, tens ofusands. if you want to make a tally of their losses, you have to remember what the situation was at time. secondly as this criterion of iraq ever attacking as, iraq did not attackan adult for eith would you hav said that war was a mistake? >> >> that is not aterion you decide you go to war. you decide it will be in your interest. the preside making thpeech never hav
WETA
Sep 1, 2010 7:00pm EDT
, margaret warner spoke with vice president biden. they met in a building north of baghdad that used to be saddam hussein' hunting lodge. >> mr. vice president, thank you for having us. >> happy to be with you, margaret. i really am. >> reporter: last night president obama said we have met our responsibility in iraq. we've been here a while. a lot of iraqis say to you, "you haven't. you came to our country, dictatorship, but at least we had services and we had security. now we don't have either." what do you say to them? i mean have we met our responsibility? >> the vast majority of iraqis i speak to acknowledge there is a great deal more security than there ever has been since the beginning of the war, number one. number two, the president said we have met our combat responsibilities, he means by that we have trained up 650,000 iraqi forces, and i might add, crack special forces, who really can do the job. but the president also pointed out that this is just the beginning of our engagement with iraq. we are ramping up our diplomatic and civilian engagement. we want to participate in helpi
WETA
Sep 27, 2010 7:00pm EDT
week in israel. to try to see, there a u.s. paper now on the table. and the goal is to use the seven days to work this out so this issue is diffused. so by the time the arabs convene their arab league meeting, this issue is off the table. as ghaith said there is an historical interest here because, in fact, when the israelis got out of gaza they pulled out 8,000 settlers. they got out-of-egypt, they pulled the settlers out of the sinai so, when it came to war and peace, the parties ultimately do find a way but right now this obstacle is hanging out there. >> and how optimistic are you about getting past that obstacle. >> i'm very optimistic. i simply ask not imagine the other side coming to the u.s. president, president obama and saying here, we're handing you a failure one month not process. it's unthinkable, inconceivable at the moment. as i said i think the strategic interest of palestinians and israelis is only through a negotiated process. they might position and posture and do brinksmanship but ultimately there is no other option in the long term but to negotiate. >> ghai
WETA
Sep 30, 2010 7:00pm EDT
on a mississippi community's plan to use stimulus money for mass transit in rural areas. >> suarez: betty ann bowser updates the johnson and johnson story as company executives and the f.d.a. come under fire on capitol hill for a string of recalls, real and phantom, this year. >> brown: and we visit a project in pittsburgh that offers foreign writers whose lives are endangered, a new start, and the chance to write freely. >> i think i'm writing social issues, but in burma, social issues are political issues. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made po
WETA
Sep 16, 2010 12:00pm EDT
opinion about that, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think it's going to work with independen
WETA
Sep 30, 2010 2:30am EDT
difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we are pbs. >> susie: it's time to get aggressive about fixing the economy. so says this voting member of the federal reserve. >> we want to get back to full employment. if we're going to do that, we need more aggressive monetary or fiscal policy, if we're going to be able to get to full employment over a reasonable period of time. >> tom: it's our exclusive interview with eric rosengren, president of the federal reserve bank of boston. you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, september 29. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made poss
WETA
Sep 7, 2010 12:30am EDT
. >> susie: good evening, everyone, and thanks for joining us for this labor day special edition. the jobs picture just keeps getting worse. tom, back in january, the economy was adding jobs and the recovery was gaining momentum. then europe's debt woes exploded and the global recovery came to a grinding halt. >> tom: susie, the latest employment numbers aren't much help. 54,000 jobs disappeared from u.s. payrolls in august, and the unemployment rate hit 9.6 >> susie: so how bad is the employment picture, and how long will it take to get back to where we were before the recession started? suzanne pratt puts it in perspective. >> reporter: it seems lately that signs like these are extremely hard to come by. even though the great recession may technically be over, the labor market is far from recovered. the nation's unemployment rate hit 10% late last year and has hovered just below there ever since. but economist dan greenhaus says that widely quoted number understates the magnitude of the job crisis and the inequalities within it. >> if you're an advanced degree white guy working not
WETA
Sep 16, 2010 12:00am EDT
difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve of financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always pleased to have venus williams on the program. she is out with a new book about the intersection between sports and that success even for everyday people. the book is called "come to win,"and features essays from bill clinton, billie jean king, and so many more. venus is always welcome on this set because she designed the set. if you look closely every night in the credits, you will see a company called the star -- you will see v starr listed in the credits. she and her company designed a whole thing. seven years later, it is holding up. >> it is holding up. thank you for not changing at. tavis: i cannot afford to change it. >> it was your vision. ta
WETA
Sep 4, 2010 12:30am EDT
he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> nationwide is on your side >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: winning of the award for lead actress in a comedy series, edie falco told the audience she was not funny. the former "sopranos" star took the emmy for a show that is sometimes funny and sometimes dark. >> i am off the clock. >> i don't mind. >> four minutes till brain damage. >> we need some help. >> i got it. [grunting] >> are you all right? tavis: fair to say this is a dark comedy? >> i think that is fair. [laughter] tavis: how the mix comedy with medicine? >> i just say the words. it is the riders that do it. tavis: what attracted you to it? >> i think jackie is funny. she is smar
WETA
Sep 24, 2010 12:30am EDT
everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: i am pleased to welcome hugh laurie to this program. he continues his role on one of tv's most popular and you need from us, "house." the show does kick of it seventh season this week. airs every monday at 8:00 on fox. here now, a scene from "house." >> i want to move on, and i cannot. all i can think about is you. i just need to know if you and i can work. >> you think i can fix myself? >> i don't know. >> i am the most screwed up person in the world. >> i know. i love you. i wish i didn't. but i cannot help it. tavis: here lari, good to have the on the program, sir. -- hugh laurie, a bit too heavy on the program. while the clip was playing, you have them turn the monitor around. you ha
WETA
Sep 16, 2010 6:00pm EDT
to penalize it, yet, this is a guarantee of our pending liberalism, leaving us to look upon a very person like a brother or sister. >> only the evangelization of culture, he said, could combat what he called the dictatorship of relativism, which was threatening to obscure the unchanging truth about man's nature, destiny, and the goodness, and as the shadows lengthen, among the crowd, the baby benedictus, her mother, one of thousands of polish migrants, who have so boosted catholic populations here. >> we think christ was very happy because this was my daughter. i bore her, and she is mine. >> before today, there was nervousness in the church about whether this day would succeed, pessimism even. not now. >> the number of people living in poverty in america has escalated sharply. these latest census bureau reports show that one in seven americans or 43 million people, are living in poverty. another awkward headline for the obama administration, already under heavy fire from critics over its handling of the economy. the report from new york with the poverty rate is above the national
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